SLCentral - Your logical choice for computing and technology
Navigation
  • Home
  • Search
  • Forums
  • Hardware
  • Games
  • Tech News
  • Deals
  • Prices
  • A Guru's World
  • CPU/Memory Watch
  • Site Info
  • How To Build Your Own Rig Part 3
    September 1999
    Discuss this article Open a printer-friendly version of this article
    E-mail this article
    What's In Part 4?

    In Part 3, I showed you how to setup the BIOS, create a boot disk, how to format & partition the hard drive, how to install the CD-ROM driver, and how to install Win95/98. In the final part, I will finish up the rest of the hardware installations which includes the sound card, the modem, and any other drives. Also, I will show you some tweaking tips to get the most out of your powerhouse homebuilt!

    Legal Notice

    As before, I have to mention this again. Please understand that this is to be done at your own risk and that I am not responsible for anything that may, or could happen to your machine. This is just to show people how to build their own computer who are willing to accept the risks and understand the consequences, if any, that go along with building their own.

    Installing The Sound Card

    This is another simple installation, but no matter how simple an installation is, you have to make sure that it is in good working condition. First off, find a PCI (or ISA if your using an old sound card) slot on your motherboard. Next, locate one of your expansion slot covers and unscrew it. Take the sound card out of it's anti-static bag and locate the slot you will be installing the card to. Handle the card by it's edges being careful to not short the card. Line up the contacts at the bottom with the slot and insert it, but do not force it. If your sound card is an ISA card, it may require some rocking to insert it as the ISA cards were long and required a little more push.

    Once you have pushed the sound card in it's slot, use the screw from the expansion slot cover to secure it into place. Now, locate the audio cable and SPDIF cable (if your sound card came with it and/or has the ability to use it) that are connected to the back of the CD-ROM drive and plug these in their respected places on the sound card. The audio cable will be what sends the sound from the CD-ROM disk to the card to be processed and then played through the speakers. Below is the back of my SBLIVE Value sound card to give you an example of where the speaker plug-in goes.

    If you have a four speaker setup, this will be a very good example for you. If you have either a two speaker setup and/or a sound card that does not have the ability for a four speaker setup, it varies from what the picture above shows. Find the speaker plug-in that plugs from one of the speakers to the sound card. If you have the four speaker setup, plug in the front speakers where it says F or Front, plug in the back speakers where it says B or Back. Some are color coded, such as the SBLIVE Value.

    If you have the two speaker setup, just plug the plug-in into where the F or Front speaker jack is located (if you have the four speaker type sound card). Or, if you have the two speaker type sound card with the two speaker setup, plug in the plug-in into where it says either SPK or LINE OUT. This will complete the physical installation of the sound card.

    As far as the software goes, Win95/98 should find the drivers for the sound card and install them automatically when it boots into Win95/98. There may have been extra software that came with your sound card, if so, then follow the instructions in your manual to install this software.

    Installing The Modem

    If for some reason you have a cable modem, you can skip this step. The modem follows the same physical installation as the sound card. First off, find a PCI slot on your motherboard. Next, locate one of your expansion slot covers and unscrew it. Take the modem out of it's anti-static bag and locate the slot you will be installing the card to. Once again, handle the card by it's edges being careful to not short the modem. Line up the contacts at the bottom with the slot and insert it, but do not force it.

    Once you have pushed the modem in it's slot, use the screw from the expansion slot cover to secure it into place. Below is a picture of the back of a typical modem to help you out.

    To connect a phone line to the modem simply find the phone cable that goes from your wall to your phone. Next, unplug it from your phone and connect it where it shows a picture of the wall outlet or it will say LINE, to that plug-in on the back of the modem. Finally, find the modem cable that came with your modem. Plug one end into the back of your phone, and the other end into where it shows a picture of a phone or it will say PHONE, to that plug-in on the back of the modem. This will complete the physical installation of the modem.

    As with the sound card, Win95/98 should find the drivers for the modem and install them automatically when it boots into Win95/98. There may have been extra software that came with your modem, if so, then follow the instructions in your manual to install this software.

    Article Options
    Discuss this article Open a printer-friendly version of this article
    E-mail this article
    Article Navigation
    Article Navigation
    1. Sound Card/Modem
    2. Tweaking/Conclusion
    Article Info
    Author: Tommy Thomas
    Company: N/A
    Article Options
    Discuss This Article
    Print This Article
    Browse the various sections of the site
    Hardware
    Reviews, Articles, News, All Reviews...
    Gaming
    Reviews, Articles, News...
    Regular Sections
    A Guru's World, CPU/Memory Watch, SLDeals...
    SLBoards
    Forums, Register(Free), Todays Discussions...
    Site Info
    Search, About Us, Advertise...
    Copyright 1998-2007 SLCentral. All Rights Reserved. Legal | Advertising | Site Info